?Do puppies get tired of barking?

Puppies bark for a variety of reasons, including to communicate with their owners, to ward off potential threats, and to establish their territory. As puppies grow older, they may become less interested in barking, but it is still common for them to bark from time to time. If your puppy is getting tired of barking, there are a few things you can do to help him or her relax: provide plenty of toys and playtime, provide positive reinforcement for good behavior, and avoid rewarding your puppy for barking.

A barking dog can be a source of frustration for pet owners; here are six techniques to help reduce your dog's or puppy's barking.While all of them can be successful, don't expect miraculous results overnight, and what works for one dog may not work for another. The longer your dog has been practicing the barking behavior, the longer it will take for them to develop other means of communication or become desensitized to the things that cause their barking now.Understanding why your dog barks is essential for selecting techniques that will work best for your specific situation.

Always keep the following tips in mind when training:

  • The goal is to identify why your dog is barking and then give them an alternative way to communicate or remove the stimulus that is causing them to bark. Yelling at your dog to be quiet will not reduce their barking.
  • Maintain a positive and upbeat attitude during your training sessions, as barking is a completely normal part of your dog's communication tools.
  • Maintain consistency to avoid confusing your dog, and having everyone in your home on the same page can lead to faster results.

Prevention is key

Whether you've recently adopted a new adult dog or are in your first week with a new puppy, keeping your dog busy and active will help reduce barking and prevent them from practicing it. Pay attention to what your dog or puppy barks at and use the tips below to reduce the frequency of barking.Barking is normal dog behavior, and puppies will not grow out of it, but you can take positive steps to reduce it and teach your dog alternative ways to communicate. Barking can be a very useful tool for learning what scares or makes your dog uncomfortable.Remember that your job as a pet parent is to advocate for your dog, which means not putting them in situations that cause them undue stress. If your dog barks incessantly, they're trying to tell you that they have an unmet need or that they need to be removed from a frightening or overwhelming situation.

Remove the motivation to bark

Your dog receives some sort of reward for barking; otherwise, they would not do it.Determine what they gain from barking and work to eliminate it.

What to Do If Your Dog Barks at Strangers

Close the curtains or place your dog in another room if they bark at people or animals passing by the living room window.

What should I do if they bark to go outside?

If your dog barks when they need to go outside, train them to jingle a bell at the door instead, beginning by bringing them to the bell and rewarding them when they touch it.Allow them to gradually ring the bell before going out to use the restroom.

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Many dogs struggle with crate training; what should you do if your dog barks constantly in his kennel?

In today's Ask a Behavior Consultant, we'll answer the following reader question:

"My 7-month-old Chihuahua, whom I just got on Saturday, won't stop barking in his kennel, and we've tried everything: I've put a blanket over his kennel, ignored him, and so on."If we don't get this together, I'll have to get rid of him; please assist."

– Sincerely, Non-Stop Barker

If you have a dog who barks nonstop in their kennel, be sure to check out the following Journey Dog Training resources:

  • Crate Training Basics
  • Should I crate train my puppy if he despises it?
  • Reasons why your dog barks when you leave him alone
  • We offer 15-minute phone consultations and one-hour video training sessions.

I've crate trained many dogs, and I know how difficult it can be to deal with a dog who barks nonstop in his kennel.

I'm glad our reader took the initiative to seek help for her dog's crate-barking problem right away!

That said, I hope she can stick with this puzzle for a while because most training issues don't resolve themselves in a matter of days.She'd only had the dog for three days when she wrote to me, and most behavior issues take much longer to resolve!

Let's look at how to teach a dog not to bark in his kennel.

?Do puppies get tired of barking?
Niffler quickly learned to relax in his crate because I only put him in it when he was tired and ready to rest.

Why does my dog bark all the time in his kennel?

Consider whether or not the dog requires crate training. In some cases, the simplest option is to ease up on crate training and do small training sessions, teaching it as an endurance skill.Dogs do not naturally sleep in their crates for 4+ hours without training, just as you cannot meditate for an hour without some practice, and this is ESPECIALLY true for young dogs.

Putting the dog in a crate and ignoring him is unlikely to work.

It's also important to consider WHEN the dog barks in his kennel: is it truly constant, or is the problem worse at certain times?

Dogs that bark when they see or hear you, for example, may be experiencing FOMO (fear of missing out). My puppy Niffler actually barked the most when I was playing with Barley (my other dog), but slept well when he was alone.It took a few weeks for him to relax when I was reading on the other side of the room because he wanted to join in the fun! I mostly crate-trained him by sitting right next to him in the crate and rewarding calm behaviors, gradually moving away from his crate.

I was also careful not to put him in the crate unless he was truly tired and relaxed, because if he was overtired, we got even more barking and fussing (just like a tired toddler who REALLY needs a nap).If he was overly tired, sometimes we got MORE barking and fussing (just like a tired toddler who REALLY needs a nap).

Meanwhile, dogs that bark the most when left alone may be suffering from separation anxiety; dogs that bark before settling in may have a crate training deficit; and dogs that bark after a long period in the crate may simply need to go potty or get some exercise.This last group of dogs deserves to be let out; it's not fair to ignore a dog who is clearly in need.

?Do puppies get tired of barking?
Niffler was kept in a large "Puppy Palace" exercise pen so he could run around, shred things, and play, and when he got tired, his crate and comfy bed awaited him.He practically self-crate trained!

Should You Ignore a Barking Dog in a Crate?

Ignoring a dog who is barking in his crate will teach him that being closed in the crate is bad and lonely; he will learn that you ignore his needs, and he may begin to panic in the crate even more.

That's not to say that ANY squeaking or crying deserves to be let out of the crate; a little fussing is normal and can be safely ignored.However, if your dog is barking excessively or appears to be in distress, it's time to intervene.But if your pup is barking more than normal or seems truly upset, it’s time to react.

Rather than ignoring your barking dog, teach him that barking in his crate results in one and only one response: a leashed excursion to the back yard for 1-2 minutes, followed by a return to his crate. This is an excellent way to teach your dog to bark when he truly needs to pee, but not to cry for attention or playtime.Try to remain neutral and calm while taking him outside.

However, all of this assumes that your dog is well-exercised and that his needs are met; if your dog is cooped up and bored, leaving him in his crate and ignoring him when he's out isn't really ethical. If your dog is cooped up and bored, it’s not really ethical to leave him in his crate and ignore him when he’s out.

Part of the reason I don't recommend ignoring a barking dog in a crate is ethical (I don't like teaching my dogs that if they're distressed, I'll ignore them), and part is practical: imagine your dog usually barks three times before you let him out of the crate, but now you've decided to ignore his barking. What happens next is known as an extinction burst.extinction burst.

How Long Should a Dog Be Allowed to Bark in His Crate?

The answer is determined by the TYPE of barking rather than the length of time.

I ignored low-level whimpering or a few seconds of fussing with my puppy Niffler, but if he barked, I took him outside for a quick potty break before returning him to his crate for a couple treats.I tried to let him out as soon as he woke up from a nap, BEFORE he began to bark, because catching him being good is essential for teaching him to be quiet in the crate!I generally ignored low-level whimpering or a few seconds of fussing. If he barked, I took him outside for a quick potty break then returned him to the crate for a couple treats. I tried to let him out as soon as he woke up from a nap, BEFORE he started to bark. Catching him being good is a key to teaching him to be quiet in the crate!

You'll need to learn what's normal for your dog, and keep in mind that young puppies (under 6 months old) are BABIES who require frequent reassurance and potty breaks.They deserve to be comforted and supported, not ignored.

Is your dog barking for attention or for something he needs?

When my puppy Niffler began barking in his crate, I tried to determine what he truly required: how long had it been since his last potty break? Was he hungry? thirsty? bored and cooped up?

In some cases, he had all of his needs met and simply desired more attention, in which case I either ignored him or walked away.If he barked at me, I found that getting up and walking away helped to solve the problem faster.

However, if you don't truly assess your pup's needs, this can be dangerous. I once got up and walked away because I was convinced Niffler only wanted attention.I returned to find a HUGE puddle on the ground - he'd needed to pee badly, and I'd underestimated how much water he'd had since our last play session.

If my dog has just had a play session and a potty break but is still barking in his crate, I'll likely settle down near his crate and read to help him calm down; if this happens frequently, I'll start giving him a long-lasting chew the moment I put him in the crate so he can transition more smoothly from playtime to chewtime to bedtime.just got a play session and a potty break but is still barking in his crate, I’ll likely settle down near his crate and read to help him settle down. If that happens repeatedly, I’d start giving him a long-lasting chew the moment I put him in the crate so he can transition from playtime to chewtime to bedtime more smoothly.

If your dog is consistently barking at you in the crate, it's time to rethink your current schedule and plan - it's not working!

?Do puppies get tired of barking?
It's simple to take your dog's crate on the road once it's been trained! Here, Barley is resting between searching boats for zebra mussels.

How to Get a Dog to Stop Barking Nonstop in His Kennel

This owner stated that she had tried putting a blanket over the dog's kennel and ignoring the dog, both of which are common techniques.They are also not always the best strategies.

Some dogs will calm down if their kennel is dark, but others will give up if their barking is ignored.But many dogs aren't so easily convinced! Here's what I'd recommend instead:

  1. If your dog has been sleeping all night and you try to put her back in the crate after a 20-minute walk, you're setting her up for failure.Check to see if your dog is satisfied, enriched, and ready to nap; if you need to put your dog away but they aren't tired enough, use an exercise pen (see #4). If your dog has been sleeping all night and you try to put her back in the crate after a 20 minute walk, you’re setting her up to fail. Ensure that your dog is fulfilled, enriched, and ready to nap. If you need to put your pup away but they’re not tired enough yet, use an exercise pen (see #4).
  2. Consider crate setup. Make sure your dog's crate is large enough and extremely comfortable.Some dogs prefer a large squishy bed and a covered crate, while others prefer a wire crate and a cooling mat. Simply moving your crate to be right next to your desk during the day or your bed at night can often calm a barking dog.White noise and dog appeasing pheremone (DAP) can also help, but don't expect those two changes to solve everything. Ensure your dog’s crate is big enough and super-comfy. Some dogs prefer a big squishy bed and covered crate while others prefer a wire crate and cooling mat. Simply moving your crate to be right next to your desk during the day or bed at night often soothes a barking dog. White noise or dog appeasing pheremone (DAP) can help as well, but don’t expect those two changes to fix it all.
    • You can then gradually move the crate to wherever you need it to be - but start with success by putting the crate close to you where you can reward your pup for being quiet; once you've achieved success there, we can move toward the final location for the crate!His crate was soon at the foot of my bed, then tucked beside the couch, exactly where I wanted it.
  3. Make the crate a fun place to be by using puzzle toys and Karen Overall's Relaxation protocol to teach your dog to hang out in the crate quietly and calmly. . Use puzzle toys and Karen Overall’s Relaxation protocol to teach your dog to quietly and calmly hang out in the crate.  
  4. Consider using an exercise pen instead of a crate. Some dogs simply prefer more space, and who can blame them? Crates are small.I used a "Puppy Palace" for Niffler and will NEVER raise a puppy without an exercise pen zone.He was able to run around, play, relieve himself, and curl up in the cozy crate without injuring himself or bothering me.. Some dogs just do better with more space! And who can blame them? Crates are tiny. Exercise pens or baby-gated rooms give your dog the ability to play, sleep, drink, or even use the bathroom if you give her a puppy litter box. I used a “Puppy Palace” for Niffler and will NEVER raise a puppy without an exercise pen zone. He could run around, play, relieve himself, or curl up in the cozy crate all without hurting himself or bugging me.
  5. Increase your dog's crate tolerance; marathon training does not begin with a 25-mile run.Start with 3 miles, maybe less, and if you want your dog to be crate-trained, start with 1-minute training sessions (or less in some cases).You're moving too quickly if your dog is crying in the crate. You don’t start marathon training with a 25-mile run. You start with 3 miles, maybe less. If your goal is a crate-trained dog, start with 1- minute training sessions (or less in some cases). If your dog is crying in the crate, you’re moving too fast.
    • That being said, there will almost certainly be times when life requires a different schedule, which is where the exercise pen comes in handy!
  6. If your dog begins to whine in her crate, let her out immediately and take her outside to relieve herself.Wait 2 minutes outside with her on a leash before returning inside.You're completely ignoring your dog, other than the fact that you're on the other end of the leash! Just show her that crying gets her a potty break, nothing more.If she uses the restroom, that's great; if she doesn't, that's fine as well.f your dog starts to fuss in the crate, let her out right away. Take her outside to go to the bathroom. Wait outside with her on a leash for 2 minutes. Then go back inside. Don’t scold her or play with her. You’re totally ignoring your dog, other than the fact that you’re on the other end of the leash! Just show her that crying gets her a potty break, nothing more. If she goes to the bathroom, great! If not, that’s ok too.
    • This teaches your dog that crying can get her a bathroom break (a valuable skill), avoids teaching your dog how to cry for hours on end, and avoids rewarding your dog with social attention for crying.
  7. When you get back inside, give your dog something to distract her by putting her back in her crate or exercise pen, but this time give her something else to do.Puzzle toys are ideal for this purpose. Put her back in her crate or exercise pen, but give her something else to do. Puzzle toys are great for this.
  8. Allow her out of the crate for playtime or cuddles only when she is quiet; if you prefer, you can release your pup as soon as she is quiet.You can also wait until your nap is over, but try to only let her out of the crate for fun times when she's quiet to avoid rewarding your dog for making a fuss.If you want, you can release your pup as soon as she quiets down. Or you can wait until the end of your nap – but try to only release her from the crate for fun times when she’s quiet. This avoids rewarding your dog for making a fuss.

Crate training can be a pain, and if you don't travel or participate in dog sports, you may not need to crate train your dog.However, if crate training is required in your home, this is how I do it.

?Do puppies get tired of barking?

Kayla founded Journey Dog Training in 2013 to provide high-quality and affordable dog behavior advice to private clients, thousands of shelter dogs, and dozens of working detection dogs. She is a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant who has worked with hundreds of private clients, thousands of shelter dogs, and dozens of working detection dogs.Kayla's advice on dog and cat behavior has been featured on NPR, the Chicago Tribune, and Pet MD. She's an avid adventurer who is currently #vanlifeing on the Pan-American Highway with her two border collies and a cat.Kayla also runs the nonprofit K9 Conservationists, where she and the dogs work as conservation detection dog teams. You can speak with a Journey Dog Training team member one-on-one here.

How much time does it take for a dog to tire of barking?

Unfortunately, dogs never tire of barking; this is normal behavior.It may appear that it would take a significant amount of energy to get them to stop barking, but it does not; barking is a form of communication for dogs.dogs do not get tired of barking. This is typical behavior. It may seem like it would take a significant amount of energy to make them stop, but it doesn't. Barking is a dog's form of communication.

How long should I put up with puppy barking?

You must completely ignore your dog (do not look at him, talk to him, or touch him) until he is completely quiet for 2-3 seconds, at which point you must praise and pay attention to him.If he barks again, you ignore him again, gradually increasing the amount of time the dog must remain quiet before you pay attention to him.until he is completely quiet for 2-3 seconds. After he is quiet you praise him and give him attention. If he barks again, you ignore again. Slowly you increase the time the dog remains quiet before you give him attention.

Is it possible to stop a puppy from barking?

Instead, try to reward your puppy with their favorite food or treat when they become quiet; if they continue to bark at you, try to ignore them or even leave the room until they become quiet.. If they continue barking at you, don't engage them but instead try to ignore them or even leave the room until they become quiet.