How to breed maine coon cats

Breeding Maine Coon cats is a relatively easy process, but there are a few things you need to keep in mind. First, make sure you have a compatible pair of cats. Second, be sure to have plenty of fresh, clean water available for both cats. Third, make sure the litter box is clean and the cats are using it regularly. Finally, keep an eye on the kittens and make sure they are getting enough milk and nutrients.

The Maine Coon is a native New Englander, having originated in Maine, where they were popular mousers, farm cats, and--most likely--ship's cats as early as the early nineteenth century.

The first thing you'll notice is that Maine Coons are huge--really huge! In fact, a Maine Coon who grew to be over four feet long holds the world record for the world's longest house cat.

But these cats have more going for them than their size. They're affectionate without being needy, adaptable, and have retained their hunting instincts in case you need a mouser. If you don't mind a lot of cat, this kitty could be a great addition to your family.

It's important to remember that cats of any breed can develop health problems at any time. A good pet insurance policy can assist you in preparing to provide your cat with the care they require at any age. Get a pet insurance policy for your Maine Coon by clicking here!

All Maine Coon cat breed characteristics are listed below!

Main Coon Cat Breed Pictures

How to breed maine coon cats

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Maine Coon Cat Breed Details, Pictures, and Characteristics

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How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

How to breed maine coon cats

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Maine Coon Cats And Kittens

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Breed Characteristics:

Affectionate with Family

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Even if they've been raised by the same person since kittenhood, some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some lavish affection on the entire family. Breed isn't the only factor influencing affection levels; cats raised in a home with people around feel more at ease with humans and bond more easily.

How to breed maine coon cats
See Cats Who Aren't Attached to Their Owners.

Amount of Shedding

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If you're going to live with a cat, you'll have to deal with cat hair on your clothes and in your home. However, shedding differs between breeds. If you're a neat freak, you'll need to either choose a low-shedding breed or lower your expectations. This furniture cover can help you clean up cat hair and keep it off your couch!

  • Cats with Low IQ

General Health

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Some breeds are predisposed to certain genetic health issues as a result of poor breeding practices. This does not imply that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; rather, they are at a higher risk. If you only want purebred cats or kittens, it's a good idea to learn about the genetic illnesses that are common in the breed you're interested in.See Cats Prone to Health Problems

Potential for Playfulness

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Some cats are perpetual kittens, full of energy and mischievousness, whereas others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful kitten sounds adorable, consider how many games of chase the mouse-toy you want to play each day, as well as whether you have children or other animals who can serve as playmates. This classic wand cat toy is ideal for playful felines!

  • See also Cats

Tendency to Vocalize

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Some breeds make more noise than others, such as meows, yowls, and chattering. Consider how the cat vocalizes and how frequently it vocalizes when selecting a breed. If constant "conversation" drives you insane, consider a kitty who is less likely to converse.See also Cats

Kid-Friendly

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Tolerance for children, strength to withstand the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and a relaxed attitude toward running, screaming children are all characteristics of a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are broad generalizations, not guarantees of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats of any breed can be good with children based on their prior experiences and personality.See Least Kid Friendly Cats

Friendly Toward Strangers

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Stranger-friendly cats will greet visitors with a curious look or a playful approach; others will be shy or indifferent, hiding under furniture or scurrying to another room. However, regardless of breed, a kitten who was exposed to a variety of people of various ages, sizes, and shapes will respond better to strangers as an adult.

  • See Cats Shy Toward Strangers

More information on this characteristic can be found by clicking here.

Easy to Groom

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Some breeds require little grooming, while others require regular brushing to stay clean and healthy. Consider whether you have the time and patience to care for a cat that requires daily grooming.

  • See Cats That Need to Groom

Intelligence

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Some cat breeds are said to be more intelligent than others. However, if cats are not provided with the necessary mental stimulation, they will create their own busy work. Interactive cat toys are a great way to keep your cat entertained and out of trouble. This scratcher cat toy will keep your smart kitty entertained even when you are not present!

  • See Cats with Less Intelligence

Pet Friendly

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Friendship with other household animals and friendship with humans are two entirely different things. Some cats are more likely to accept other pets in the home than others.

  • See Least Pet Friendly Cats

Vital Stats:

Life Span:

9 to 15 years

Length:

30 to 40 inches

Weight:

9 to 18 pounds

Origin:

Maine, USA

More About This Breed

  • History

    The Maine Coon, as the name suggests, is from Maine, where the breed was popular as a mouser, farm cat, and ship's cat as early as the early nineteenth century. They are a natural breed with little information about their origins. Some claim they were brought to North America by Vikings centuries before Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Others claim they are the descendants of Marie Antoinette's longhaired cats, who were sent to America ahead of the doomed queen, who had hoped to escape there. Longhaired cats may have been brought back by sea captains and mated with local shorthaired cats. One thing is certain: the Maine Coon is not the result of a cat-raccoon mating, despite their brown tabby coat and furry ringed tail implying that biological impossibility. However, the resemblance is how the cats got the "Coon" part of their name. In fact, Maine Coons without the brown tabby coat were known as Maine Shags.

    The first written mention of a Maine Coon was in 1861, and it was about a black-and-white cat named Captain Jenks of the Horse Marines. In 1895, a female Maine Coon was named Best Cat at a cat show in Madison Square Garden. Home-bred felines were popular exhibits at cat shows in Boston and New York, and when the Cat Fanciers Association was founded in 1908, the fifth cat registered was a Maine Coon named Molly Bond. However, the arrival of glamorous Persian and exotic Siamese cats from England around the turn of the century effectively ended the Maine Coon's popularity for the next five decades. Things improved in the 1960s, and the Maine Coon Breeders and Fanciers Association was founded in 1968. These large, beautiful cats are now among the most popular breeds in the world. What really matters, of course, is that they are Maine's official state cat.

  • Size

    This is a large cat. Most Maine Coons weigh 9 to 18 pounds (males weigh more), and some weigh 20 pounds or more. They do not reach full maturity until they are three to five years old.

  • Personality

    The good-natured and affable Maine Coon fits in well with a variety of lifestyles and personalities. They enjoy being around people and have a habit of following them around, but they are not dependent. They enjoy receiving attention when it is directed their way, but if you are busy, they are content to simply observe your activities. Close a door on them, and they will patiently wait for you to realize your mistake and let them in. They are not typically lap cats, but they do enjoy being near you.

    They also keep their ability as a mouser. No rodents will be safe in a house with a Maine Coon. Even if there are no mice to chase, they will keep their skills sharp by chasing toys and grabbing them with their large paws. A Maine Coon enjoys fetching and will retrieve small balls, toys, or wadded-up pieces of paper. They can climb just as well as any other cat, but they prefer to stay on the ground. After all, that is where their work is. They are also extremely intelligent and will gladly learn tricks or play with puzzle toys that challenge their brain.

    Maine Coons have a kittenish love of play that lasts well into adulthood. Males, in particular, are prone to silly behavior. Females are more dignified, but they enjoy a good game of chase as well. They are not particularly vocal, and any requests are made in a soft chirp or trill.

  • Health

    Pedigreed and mixed-breed cats both have different incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. The Maine Coon may encounter the following issues.:

    • Hip dysplasia, which can cause lameness in severe cases.
    • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a type of inherited heart disease in Maine Coons. A DNA-based test is available to identify cats who carry one of the disease-causing mutations.
    • Polycystic kidney disease is a heritable kidney disease that progresses slowly and can lead to renal failure.
    • Spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic disorder that affects the trunk and limb skeletal muscles. A test for identifying carriers and affected kittens is available.

    Regardless of how healthy your cat is when you first bring them home, you should be prepared for any problems that may arise during their lifetime. A pet insurance policy can help you prepare for any veterinary needs that your cat may have. Find pet insurance for your Maine Coon by clicking here!

  • Care

    Despite its length, the Maine Coon's coat has a silky texture that doesn't mat easily if groomed on a regular basis. It requires only twice-weekly combing to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. A stainless steel comb for removing tangles and a "grooming rake" for pulling out dead undercoat, which causes tangles if not removed, are both useful grooming tools. Use it gently, especially on the stomach and tail. Maine Coons are patient, but they despise having their hair pulled just as much as you do. Examine the tail for poop stuck to the fur and clean it with a baby wipe. Bathe your Maine Coon as needed, which could be every few weeks or every few months. If their coat is greasy or their fur is stringy, they require a bath.

    Brush your teeth to avoid periodontal disease. Daily dental hygiene is ideal, but weekly brushing is preferable to nothing. Every couple of weeks, trim your nails. To remove any discharge, use a soft, damp cloth to wipe the corners of the eyes. To avoid the spread of infection, use a separate area of the cloth for each eye. Check the ears weekly. If they appear dirty, use a cotton ball or soft damp cloth moistened with a 50-50 mixture of cider vinegar and warm water to clean them. Cotton swabs should be avoided because they can cause damage to the ear's interior.

    Maintain a spotless litter box for the Maine Coon. Cats are very particular about bathroom hygiene, and keeping the litter box clean will help keep the coat clean as well.

    It's best to keep a Maine Coon as an indoor-only cat to protect it from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and other dangers that cats face when they go outside, such as being hit by a car. Maine Coons that go outside are also at risk of being stolen by someone who wants to have such a beautiful cat without having to pay for it.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    A Maine Coon is a large, rugged cat with a smooth, shaggy coat that appears to be capable of spending an entire day mousing on a farm in all weather conditions. Indeed, they were bred for such work in the harsh Maine climate, and their breed standard reflects this, calling for a medium-to-large cat with a well-proportioned muscular and broad-chested body. A Maine Coon has substantial, medium-length legs and large, round, fur-tufted paws that serve as "snowshoes" in the winter.

    A heavy coat is shorter on the shoulders, longer on the stomach and britches (long fur on the upper hind legs), and has a ruff in front and a long, furry tail that waves hello. A medium-width head has a squarish muzzle and is slightly longer than it is wide. Large, well-tufted ears taper to a point at the base, and large, expressive eyes are green, gold, greenish-gold, or copper. Maine Coons that are white or bi-colored may have blue or unusual eyes.

    Because the brown tabby pattern is so common in this breed, many people are unaware that Maine Coons can be any color or pattern. They may be surprised to learn that Maine Coons come in solid colors like black, red, or white, as well as all tabby colors and patterns, bi-colors like blue and white or red and white, and patterns like tortoiseshell and calico.

  • Children And Other Pets

    The laid-back, friendly Maine Coon is an excellent choice for families with children and cats. They enjoy the attention they receive from children who treat them politely and respectfully, and they don't mind dressing up or riding in a baby buggy.

    Because of their friendly demeanor, they are also content to live with cat-friendly dogs. Introduce pets gradually and under controlled conditions to ensure that they learn to coexist.

  • Rescue Groups

    There are numerous cat rescue organizations, some of which are breed specific. If you're looking for a nonprofit Maine Coon rescue near you, try the links below.

    • Maine Coon Adoptions
    • Maine Coon Rescue

    You can also search for adoptable cats by breed and zip code on CatTime's adoption page.

    At some point in their lives, all cats will require veterinary care. When you adopt, make certain that you are prepared to deal with any health issues that may arise after you leave the shelter. A pet insurance policy can protect your cat. Get an insurance policy for your Maine Coon by clicking here!

    What is the cost of breeding Maine Coons?

    When you buy a cat for breeding, you must pay an additional breeding fee, which is usually around $100. around $2,000 . Many breeders would rather "rent" a high-quality stud, often a show cat, to breed with their female.

    How many kittens do Maine Coons typically have?

    The average litter size of a Maine Coon is about four or five They rarely have litters of more than six kittens. In exceptional circumstances, they can give birth to up to twelve kittens at once!

    What are the two breeds that make up a Maine Coon?

    According to genetic testing, the Maine Coon is a descendant of both the A mysterious extinct domestic breed and the Norwegian Forest cat As a result, the Vikings are most likely to blame.